Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Working Weekend

    This past weekend was supposed to be a group working weekend; however, Wednesday I received a call from my close family friend that a branch fell on one of my dad's storage buildings and punctured a hole in the roof. He routinely goes up and checks on the place for me. Hell, he helped with welding the chain, and installing the gate to the property the day before dad's funeral. Since Duke was out of town and I needed to go take care of this, Stephen thought it was best to cancel the group workday. We arrive late Friday night after picking the kids up from school and as it was dark, I waited until the next morning to investigate.

    Once I wake up and have my coffee, I proceed to investigate what had happened. The property has numerous large, and I mean large oak trees with an abundance of acorns too. I discovered there is one branch on the oak tree adjacent to the oldest storage building had one limb that was in bad shape. I suppose one of the storms that passed through from the last time I was up there had snapped this bad limb in half and the other half came down and punctured the roof. It's a dead limb, but it sure as hell is not rotten.



    I grab dad's keys and open the door and the limb happened to puncture the roof just aft of the soffit, and when it fell through must have hit the top sill plate and bounced out and off the roof.


    The repair consisted of pushing the still attached plywood back into place, with it being slightly wet from rain was easy to push back into place. I cut a 2x4  and used it as a brace under it with two nails through the rafter, and two nails toe nailed into the face of the other rafter. In past experiences with nailing through 40 + year old wood, it was quite difficult to do in a small space without bending the nail. I finally resorted to toe nailing it into both through the brace.

Once done, I climbed up on the roof and used some metal flashing to replace the shingle that was missing.


   Once in place, using some roofing nails to secure the metal and remaining tabs of the nearby shingles, I commenced to using a whole tube of wet/dry roofing caulk to cover the nails and the metal flashing in a nice layer of gooey tar.

 
 
   Once finished there were a few other things to do. My dad always worried about his fireplace, specifically the stove pipe. He told me for years that it needed to be replaced. I decided to take a gander up to the roof, visually inspect the stove pipe from the top down. I was really surprised at the condition it was in, it had some slight build up but not enough to sweep it. I pull the roof cap off and inspected the galvanized piping he had the stove pipe in and it still looked brand new. Well next test was to light a small fire, get it going good, then cut off most of the air to it and generate a lot of smoke. Once done, back on the roof, with the use of my 400 lumen flashlight, eyes, and nose, I observed no smoke, only from the end of the stove pipe. Only thing between the other two galvanized pipes was a bit of heat coming out from the stove pipe itself. Well seems to me that everything is ok.
 
   With more time on my hands, his 1948 Farmall Cub tractor needed the fuel bowl gasket replaced. I make a quick call and find that my family friend had some, so I run over for a few minutes. Once back, took about 20 minutes to change it out, put some fresh gas in it and cranked it up. Ran like a champ. The next 2 hours were spent plowing the garden area up. My dad stopped having a garden about 4 years ago, he just couldn't manage it like he did in his older age. I have been down there before messing around but this time I went all out. I know it is not the prettiest tractor out there, but it has been mechanically sound and well taken care of.
 

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    Once done this is the view of the garden, the back right corner will be where I plan on putting a burm for a firing  range. I got the word out that I will take any fill dirt locals are wanting to get rid of and our friend has two front loaders with backhoe's attached, shouldn't take to long to construct. Hey, when you have a 186 acre cattle farm, you can write a lot of equipment off.
 
 
 
 
Have a great week.
 
Senior
 
 
   

 
   



    

12 comments:

  1. Good thing you have friends checking the place... THAT could have been ugly! And when's the range opening??? :-)

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    1. I'm thankful that he is nearby, and also have others I have known for over 35 years. Don't know, it will be a work in progress. I have one neighbor I want to discuss the range with since he has a horse pasture behind the woodline, just to make sure he is cool with it.

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  2. Senior,

    I'm happy to hear you were able to fix the roof damage caused by the tree branch.
    Your father's tractor is awesome my friend!!!! I love old tractors, she looks like she works pretty good too.

    Nope not bad at all having 186 acres.

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    1. Thanks Sandy. I wish I had that many acres.

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  3. I absolutely LOVE those Farmall Cubs. My Step Dad still has the one his father bought back in the 40's although he hasn't messed with it in years it has been inside stored up so it should be brought back up to running with little effort.

    Smaller tractors are also going to be the wave of the future I believe so your ahead of the game.

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    1. They made a good tractor, the production run was tremendous success for IH. I was surprised too that it is actually pretty good on gas.

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  4. +1 to NFO's query about the range. :) Srsly, glad you got the hole fixed before anything worse happened as a result.

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    1. I don't like putting issues like this off. I would rather take care of it as soon as possible than having water damage it anymore.

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  5. That's a nice looking place. Falling branches , and falling trees, are a major pain. After every storm I have to go out and clean up, and it's rare for me not to have to chain saw a tree off the jeep trail somewhere along the way down the mountain if the wind blows hard. Glad you got your repairs done.

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    1. I worry about those trees up there. I have one large oak that is dying, but is not near any structures, and its almost on the property line, so hopefully it falls on the other side of the line.

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  6. Good on you for preventing that water damage. I know it shot your weekend having to run up there. I also saw on JUGM's blog were you got to plant that Dogwood a few weeks back and where the boys added the mulch and rocks this weekend. Looks like a great spot.

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    1. Yeah, I had to go take care of court stuff, and took it up there a few weeks ago. Alittle money spent now in gas, goes along way.

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